Friday, March 22, 2013

Removable battery - do we really need it?

With every release of a new smartphone the same question is asked - will it have removable battery? If you believe that removable batteries are a "must have" nowadays, please keep reading. I hope you'll change your mind!

First of all - there is a solution. Battery banks seems to be a great alternative for removable batteries. You can check my review of HTC Battery Bank here. It works with every device equipped with micro-USB port. Now let's compare both solutions.
Capacity
Samsung Galaxy S3 has a removable battery with capacity of 2100mAh. Typical battery bank has a capacity of 6000mAh. This means, that Galaxy S3 can be charged almost 3 times with such battery bank! If you are going to use your smartphone heavily the whole day, only one backup battery might be not enough for you. With battery bank you can start your day with more then 8000mAh on board (battery inside device + battery bank).

Conclusion: 2300mAh vs. 6000mAh
Winner: battery bank


Size
Typical smartphone battery dimensions are around 6,3 x 5,0 x 0,5. Battery bank I was tested is of course bigger - 9,7 x 4,2 x 2,2. Is it really a disadvantage? I don't think so. It's small enough to be inserted into a pocket of your jeans or jacket. I think there are even smaller battery banks available on the market, so the size shouldn't be a problem here. Also, removable batteries are indeed smaller, but keep in mind their capacity is twice/triply lower.

Conclusion: 6,3 x 5,0 x 0,5 vs 9,7 x 4,2 x 2,2
Winner: removable battery

Charging
Battery bank can be charged regardless of device battery. It has its own USB cable and charging port, so you can charge both devices -  smartphone and battery bank at the same time. What about removable batteries? Well, if you don't have a removable battery charger (which costs extra money of course!) you will have to charge battery inside your device first, then switch batteries and charge the backup battery. The risk of braking battery cover latches is quite big, especially when it comes to plastic, which has its own lifetime and bending abilities. It seems that battery bank in this case is much more convenient and comfortable.

Conclusion: charging inside the device vs. independent charging
Winner: battery bank

Price
Original backup battery price is about $30. Yes, I know you can find non-original replacements for $10 as well, but let's compare only original parts. Typical battery bank costs is around $40 - $80 ($75 for HTC Battery Bank). However these prices vary from place to place and may be slightly different in your country, keep that in mind. Comparing 1:1 it's easy to see that external batteries are indeed cheaper. But to make the comparison fair, we need to establish the price/capacity relationship. 1mAh from 2300mAh backup battery ($30) is a cost of about $0,0130, while 1mAh from 6000mAh battery bank ($75) costs about $0,0125.

Conclusion: $0,0130 vs. $0,0125
Winner: battery bank

Design
When speaking about the design I mostly think about device design. However, battery banks looks definitely better and more aesthetic than regular removable batteries. Having a removable battery back cover doesn't allow uni-body construction, like HTC One has. Design is a matter of taste, but personally I prefer uni-body construction over having a plastic back cover. But again - it's a matter of taste, so no winner here.

Conclusion: plastic back cover vs. uni-body construction
Winner: draw

Usability
Practical approach is also important. Driving a car or sitting in a crowded bus might be a situation when your device is out of power. Now imagine you need to: 1) take out your battery backup, 2) turn off the device, 3) remove the back cover, 4) replace the battery, 5) close the back cover, 6) turn on the device, 7) hide your primary battery. So... 7 steps including the inevitability of turning off the device. With battery bank you just need to take it out and plug into the device. That's it. No need to turn on/off or disassemble your device. Keep in mind that battery bank doesn't work only as external battery, it is mainly a battery charger, so after some time you can hide it back.

Conclusion: 7 steps to change battery vs. take out and plug in
Winner: battery bank

Compatibility
External batteries are not compatible between devices. You can't use Samsung Galaxy Note II battery in Samsung Galaxy S3. You can't use HTC Sensation battery in HTC One S. If you buy backup battery for your particular device, you'll probably sell it together with the device or give it as free bonus one day. Battery bank is compatible with every device equipped with micro-USB port and can be your life-companion for years. However, you should be aware that battery bank might not be able to charge your tablet.

Conclusion: lack of compatibility with other devices vs. compatibility with all micro-USB smartphones
Winner: battery bank

Device lifetime (added 23-03-2013)
Due to many comments under this article I decided to agree with one point that was very often mentioned by users preferring removable battery. However, I think it needs some bigger explanation. It is a fact, that having non removable battery results in lack of possibility to exchange it for new one, once the old battery can't give your device enough power anymore. But is it really a problem? I took the warranty statements from my HTC One X+ and I found nothing about limited warranty for battery (like Samsung have - only 6 months). This means, that once battery is non removable, it doesn't have shorter warranty. So in my case battery is under 24-months warranty service. I think that is a positive aspect for the consumer, right? In some cases it might be also 12-months, but it depends on particular law regulations in each country.

Conclusion: removable battery with 6-months warranty vs. non-removable battery with 12/24-months warranty - both solutions have some advantages
Winner: draw

Possibility to reset the device (added 25-03-2013)
One more category added. Very often I hear that possibility to remove the battery is the only way to reset the device once it's not reacting anymore and system just hanged. This is not true. Every device have ability to reset the system using hardware keys. In most cases it's a combination of 3 buttons: power + volume up + volume down. You need to hold these buttons for about 5-20 seconds, depends on the device. Even if your device has a removable battery, it is better to use above combination to avoid breaking the plastic back cover latches.

Conclusion: you can reset your device no matter if it has removable battery or not
Winner: draw


So what's the score? Battery bank won in 5 comparisons, external battery in 1 comparison and there were also 3 draws. For me, personally, battery banks are better replacement for external batteries. It gives you bigger capacity for the same prize, extended usability and it looks better.

Do you have a different point of view or some experience with one of the approaches presented above? Please leave a comment below! Also, if you like this article, please use media sharing buttons (Twitter, G+, Facebook) down this post!



62 comments:

  1. buddy, i agree with you stating the fact that we don't need a removable battery.
    now lets consider a case when your phone doesn't respond to any inputs, be it touch or hardware buttons. to be precise your phone has hung and it doesn't respond to the power button, what would you do in such a case, and remember that you don't have a removable battery.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In every HTC device there is a combinations of following buttons - power + vol up + vol down. Such combination resets the device and it always works, no matter of how hard your device frozen ;)

      Delete
    2. LOL..every device have a combination of button to reset it.. those creators are not stupid as u thought

      Delete
    3. For some reason that combination has stopped working on my Evo 3D.

      Also, I usually keep my phones for more than two years. A 24-month warranty is completely useless when most batteries don't start going bad until they're 2.5-3 years old.

      Non-removable battery = very expensive brick after a few years

      Delete
    4. For some reason hardware buttons can be broken.
      And for that reason only,you can't reset your phone if you can't remove the battery.
      ....being said that,there's another way to reset the phone......let the battery die by itself :D

      Delete
    5. I've owned 3 Androids so far and all of them have started acting up. the first 2, the only way I could get them to behave was to remove the battery. The third, the battry isn't removable so i can't make it behave when it acts up. I've also turned them off to conserve power when I cant' get a signal or can't recharge it for extended periods. They have ALL turned themselves back on within 10 minutes and the only way I could keep them powered off was to remove the battery. The techs were useless and can only do a factory reset, and lose all of my contacts and stored data..despite "backing it up".

      I have also had batteries die and had to get replacements.

      There are MANY MANY reasons to desire a removable battery. The wonderful features that some see in a nonremovable battery doesn't change that some peopel just want to be able to pull the battry out to do a hard reset, conserve power, replace the battery.... the point is some people just want to remove the battry.

      Delete
  2. really nice read see what you mean but i still like that i can buy a new battery for my phone when the old the starts to lose capacity
    and again i had a few times where i had to pull out the battery off my dhd to restart it

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is a good point, but I wonder this: typical battery should last about 2 years. For the first year you have a warranty. Do you keep your devices for more then 2 years?

      Delete
    2. i had my dhd since it was realeased in Denmark (was like a month later than most other country's)
      and again i dont really need to have the latest flagship all the time my dhd is still doing what i need it to do

      Delete
    3. I agree that having a device for more then 2 years could be problematic without the possibility to replace the battery. This is a valid point, but I think majority of users doesn't buy new batteries.

      Delete
    4. but again i would say that this aint a point that wont make me buy a htc one not to much of a problem but still a little downside imo
      then again the battery in htc one is like double the capacity than my dhd
      and the design of the phone looks really nice when you dont need to have a battery cover

      Delete
    5. Maybe I am wrong but for battery we have only 6months of warranty.mostly I am using my phone for 2years

      Delete
    6. About buying new battery.. Think that You are an old guy and You are not a toy boy or a geek, You like Your phone and it is enought for You and You don't want to replace it for a new one, but the battery is so week that it won't last a day without charging, what is the easiest solution?? Replace only the battery.

      Delete
    7. Mad Juhl and mike1986 both are correct.
      But IMHO being able to replace the battery is a - somewhat- MORE POWERFUL option.

      I have a HD2 & it's still working perfectly, but the battery is getting weaker & weaker.
      HD2 is a flagship device and one of the legendary devices that most owner won't throw it away,trade it with another device or sell it.
      It's impossible to keep such device if we can't replace the battery with a new one.

      Let's say that HTC One X+ is becoming a legendary device, can you keep it for longer than 3 years without being able to replace the battery?

      Being said that, most device can be opened, even devices with non replaceable battery.
      And we can "replace" the battery after it dies.
      But this option is for tech enthusiasts/experts only.

      Delete
  3. Excellent analysis, I just invested in an external battery recently and it is perfect, as long as it works with other devices ...
    We need only, one solution for the Micro SD Port!
    Thanks Mike.
    Ced357

    ReplyDelete
  4. When i had a XE last year i used alternative batteries as it was easier to switch rather than recharge.

    Currently i have the HOX and the inability to exchange batteries was a blow to me, always waiting for it to recharge.

    I have a battery bank now and it does the trick, and easily snugs into my back pocket. I'm not sure tho the fact it is charged several times per day is good for the battery tho...

    I hope one of the next gen phones comes with a removable battery. Or atleast has enough power to last me through my working day.

    ReplyDelete
  5. OK accepted, now let's say that an amateur has started using the phone, and if he encounters the problem, he will not know the procedure to reset the phone. What should he do then?
    To the common person removing the battery and putting it back and starting the phone would work, since n he has a noon removable battery, what is he supposed to do?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was that guy when i got my hox, a quick search on google found the solution. Or alternavly wait for tha battery to die -.-

      Delete
    2. Ok let me put it this way - let's say that an amateur has started using the TABLET, and if he encounters the problem, he will not know the procedure to reset the tablet. What should he do then?

      Both amateurs - the one with phone and the one with tablet have a problem. If they don't know they method to reset their device by pushing 3 buttons all together they need to wait until the device is discharged. But is it enough to say that removable batteries are batter? I don't think so... it doesn't happen very often when regular user have to reset his device. And if he is using custom ROM, he probably have (or should have) enough knowledge to reset the device using 3 buttons combination.

      Delete
    3. He will ask someone with a higher knowledge! ^^
      I think a bloody starter is already overburdened with removing the battery. I really like the way that my nexus 4 does it. U just need to hold down the power button for around 5-10 seconds (i dont know it exactly)and the phone turns off. This is the same procedure as with any other Laptop or PC and so, pretty well-known. In my opinion the removable battery is as overrated as the external sd slot. Ok, you got more space to save something, but u can disable your PIN and privacy settings, because everyone can simply read all of your personal data with an sd slot through getting root acces to your phone. Internal space is way faster (isnt it?) and safer (as long as u dont keep your debugging mode on the whole time). Well, sorry for that much off topic...

      Delete
    4. We do have a user manual dude..

      Delete
    5. Well, i'm not using any custom ROM on my device(HTC Flyer) and it doesn't have a removable battery. I totally understood the reason for having a removable battery on your device, when once I was updating my tablet's OS from GB to Honeycomb and the device just froze out of nowhere...And then i thought i should plug-in the charger and start charging it, so that my tab doesn't get bricked while updating half way thru..But as i plugged the charger the LED wasn't blinking and the tablet was not charging and the installation process was just frozen in that state till my tab's battery died out..And You would eventually expect your tablet to start charging once it's fully turned off or once the battery has fully drained out, But, my tablet was not charging at all any further...And the warranty was done as i bought this tab like around 3 years ago...So yeah, that could be one reason I'd prefer to have a removable battery...Wonder what solutions could not so geeky folks come up with when in such a situation..Had to dump my device away :(

      Delete
  6. I don't need a removable battery but it would be nice to have, not to mention you wouldn't have to spend £50 on a battery bank, £10 could get you an official replacement.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Maybe he would better Rtfm?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mmh, if the amature does not read, there will probably be an YouTube video about it. ;-)

      Delete
  8. I think one major criteria you missed is storage while charging, what if you are walking on the street, require to use the phone but its running so low u have to plug the bank in too? I think it is a big inconvenience especially with big devices like the note that require 2 hands to hold already. Thoughts?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Personally I never had a problem with walking with battery bank plugged in. With USB cable of regular length, you can hide the bank in the pocket. But yes - in general battery bank is surely something more to carry along. But after 30 minutes of charging you can disconnect the bank and hind back.

      There are positives and negatives. For me batter bank have more positives over removable battery, but that doesn't mean removable battery doesn't have positives at all. The thing is - after balancing both, I decided I prefer battery bank.

      Delete
  9. But if the internal battery dies, you have to send it to the repair center. thats what sucks so hard about it.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Ive always had extra batteries, having a dhd meant I got through 4 batteries a day, being that they were used regular I had a separate battery charger for the batteries so no faffing about charging them with my phone. Extra batteries for the dhd were a must. Now there are battery banks - I like the idea, especially as its 6000mh as the dhd is only 1230ma so that would last for Nearly 5 charges so enough for a days use. (I am a very heavy phone user) but having to change a battery (takes 30secs) vs having to have the battery bank plugged in for how long to charge the phone - spare battery wins that one. The whole point for having the spare batteries on the dhd was so it wasnt constantly plugged in.
    I now have a SGN2 and the battery is incredible compared. You can get a 6400ma battery for it which lasts a couple of days of heavy use so no need for battery bank or replacement spares!
    I didnt get the N2 because it had a good battery I got it for other reasons - the awesome battery was a surprise, battery size will be the deciding factor in future purchases and if its unibody the it cannot be replaced with a higher capacity unit so battery cover phones win there. Unibody phone do have the potential to look better but for me functionality is first.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anthony, thanks for sharing your experience!

      Delete
  11. Agree with your post.
    I just bought a low cost batery bank^^
    Can you tell us which one do you use Mike please ?

    ReplyDelete
  12. I use this one - http://android-revolution-hd.blogspot.com/2013/01/htc-battery-bank-short-review.html

    ReplyDelete
  13. True thoughts... and let's be honest: The device needs (HOX+ in my case) to be charged every night anyway. So no need to have the possibility to change the battery for a more powerful one. I guess the good old times where you had to charge the device only every week are definitely over.

    My battery tank (I have one who also works with a solar power unit) is always with me in my bag. I am quite safe this way.

    And if a fixed battery gives the developers more possibilities for making beautiful devices (such as THE ONE), so again... no need for a changeable one.

    CHeers

    K.

    ReplyDelete
  14. So, the question "do we really need removable batery" wasn't really answered, it's not like you can choose between bank and removable, 'cause even if you choose bank, you still need a betery to charge lol (being removable or not)... A better question is "do we really need a batery bank" and the answer is yes, yes we do.

    ReplyDelete
  15. My comment:

    1. Phones are heading to buttonless era. If so, pulling out the battery for a hard reset could be useful.

    2. Battery capacity is going up and up. Don't you see that could be a safety issue? Do you know that where the battery came from? Or you will know when it explode? Myself would presume it came from China. Do you trust Made In China? I won't. So removable battery enable you check it from day to day. Or you are just carrying a ticking bomb

    3. Oh...if battery came from China, then battery bank came from ?

    ReplyDelete
  16. I agree with you. But I'm missing a crucial point: What about the environment? every 2 years, a new device because the battery does not work anymore or maybe sooner? that is not environmentally friendly. And I think there needs to take place to rethink about that!
    Would a device with a Power Pack work, when the internal battery is faulty?
    i am using my Samsung Galaxy S1 since 3 Year and i am happy with that (and with me second battery)
    (sorry for using Google translator..)

    ReplyDelete
  17. What I really want is the possibility to choose between all: battery bank, replacement battery or even a higher capacity battery.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That would be great, but then we loose to possibility to have uni-body design :) Of course uni-body is a matter of taste, as I mentioned before.

      Delete
    2. That's the beauty of having a replaceable battery. You can have all of it!

      Delete
  18. I had 4 batteries with my Desire HD, 2 batteries with my HTC(holiday) Raider 4G and it was a bit uncomfortable(Opening, pulling out and putting in the batteries and closing the cover) but not a big problem for me and it was inevitable because i was a full phone gamer. But now that I'm using HTC Droid DNA(and its battery performance/life is better than having 3 DHD and 2 Raider 4g batteris) I think battery bank is my last resort(which is very much ok with me) because there's no way of pulling the battery out! but my HTC T-mobile g2's battery is dying and i don't have extra.. hahaha

    ReplyDelete
  19. As for the added point, how would a battery be measured, as the battery life gets shorter, how short is enough to get it replaced under warranty? After youve had the phone 18 months, and the battery is only lasting 5 hours on a full charge, would the fix that under warranty or just claim fair use?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I can't ensure you that your battery will be replaced on warranty after 2 years, because as you said there is no determinant. I would guess, that if the battery didn't last long enough for the typical battery of its kind then is should be replaced.

      Delete
  20. Great article Mike! I personally hate swapping batteries, however a big plus in a removable battery is the ability to exchange it with a bigger one. I'm using a mugen 1950mah on my sensation which has expanded my uptime for quite a bit.

    Another big minus (at least for me) is that the service center on my country (arvato) is known for it's crappy job, sometimes returning devices scratched or broken apart (http://www.insomnia.gr/uploads/gallery/album_590/gallery_234431_590_772572.jpg) so I'd think twice before sending my future One X+ there if the battery fails.

    But I guess that's not something which happens everywhere :D

    ReplyDelete
  21. Im not familiar with any of the unibody designs, im aware the iphone has a non replaceable battery - is that correct? I have seen batterys for iphones available for sale so can assume the non replaceable battery actually is replaceable with the use of a screwdriver or whatever, obviously thats no good on a day to day basis but it does mean that a dead or dying battery isnt the end. --or I maybe completely wrong on this??? --

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What im meaning is that on the unibody phones are the batteries hardwired/soldered in? If not then is replaceable. I wouldnt want to start soldering to replace a battery

      Delete
  22. Or just have a removable battery and a battery bank. Win win solution. I don't like battry banks, some are too big and some requires you to tether it to the device. And since it is not officially made by the manufacturer, we can't always guarantee the safety. And yes, it is always more expensive than the actual batteries.

    Having a removable battery will then give you an option to choose either using a battery bank or just buy a new battery.

    So removable batteries will always be better than non-removable ones.

    ReplyDelete
  23. we really need it, so that in case you're out of power you can change it easily and a reserved charge battery with you

    ReplyDelete
  24. IMO, battery banks still lack one very important feature - Wireless Charging. I dislike carrying or protruding cables either from pocket or bags. As soon as manufacturers release phones(I know there are some out there) and battery banks with wireless charging. I'm on board. I could be wrong but afaik there are no wireless charging battery banks out there at the moment.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Battery banks are simply a fix to a problem that shouldn't exist in the first place. The Usability section is misleading. It should be updated as follows:

    BATTERY BANK
    1) Take out your battery bank (10 seconds)
    2) Take out USB plug (1 second)
    3) Plug in USB into Battery bank & phone (1 seconds)
    4) Charge phone to 10% (Maybe 5-12 minutes - based on approximate 2 hour charging time of the iPhone 5)
    5) Unplug phone and put away battery bank (10 seconds)

    Total Time: 5 minutes 11 seconds
    Repeat this 10 times to achieve %100 battery capacity or wait 2 hours

    REMOVABLE BATTERY
    1) take out your battery backup (10 seconds)
    2) turn off the device (15 seconds)
    3) remove the back cover (2 seconds)
    4) replace the battery (2 seconds)
    5) close the back cover (1 second)
    6) turn on the device (30 seconds)
    7) put away your primary battery (10 seconds)

    Total Time: 1 minutes 10 seconds
    Repeat this 1 time to achieve %100 battery capacity.
    Winner: Removable battery

    ReplyDelete
  26. USER REMOVABLE BATTERY EVERY TIME WITH A SPARE CHARGER. NO MATTER HOW SAFE THE BATTERY CHARGING MIGHT BE IT IS NEVER WISE TO CHARGE THE BATTERY INSIDE AN ENCLOSED PHONE. ...AT LEAST I DO NOT THINK SO...I LIKE THE BATTERY TO BREATHE AS IT CHARGES....AND ALL THE MANUFACTURERS AND THEIR CLEVER DESIGNERS AND MARKETING MEN ARE ACTUALLY TRYING TO MANIPULATE THE MARKET BY DOING WHAT THEY DO. ....DO NOT BE FOOLED. ...ALWAYS DEMAND A MACHINE WITH A USER REMOVABLE BATTERY....AND IF NEED BE....DONT BUY FROM A CERTAIN MANUFACTURER FOR A COUPLE OF GENERATIONS OF THEIR NEW PRODUCTS AND THEY WILL SOON GET THE MESSAGE.....HOWEVER I ONLY WISH THERE WERE MORE INTELLIGENT CONSUMERS IN THIS WORLD WHO ACTUALLY PUT THIER INTELLIGENCE TO USE BEFORE BLINDLY GOING WITH A SO CALLED TREND OF COSMETIC DRESSING OF MARKETING PEOPLE

    ReplyDelete
  27. Indispensable is a possibility to switch of the device permanently and to be sure it is so. Period

    ReplyDelete
  28. Battery Bank and Removable Battery is True Winner :)

    ReplyDelete
  29. If you are handy with the proper tools, you can replace even a "non removable battery". Instructions for most popular brands can be found online. If you're too squeamish, there are many companies that will perform the service for you. What if the device is discontinued, you ask? There are still battery replacement services available for the first generation Ipod, despite the fact that it's unlikely that many people still have one that works. Mine broke down before the battery got to the point of needing replacing (though I do admit it was lasting shorter by then). Of all the phones I've had (4 now) none of them have lasted long enough for battery life to become a problem. Oddly enough, I've not had any brand more than once, but I've never had an actual smart phone

    Having said that, I would say that if I had the choice between 2 phones with the same operating system (which I liked) and one had a removable battery, I would probably go for the removable one. However, due to the fact that I've taken many things apart and successfully gotten them back together again, I wouldn't mind having a "non-removable" one.

    ReplyDelete
  30. A brick with cables is not the most elegant solution, while a replacement battery you can have in your wallet is. But I guess some people don't mind that.

    On the other hand...
    I've been a witness of at least 5 cases of phones being dropped into water (toilets, puddles, beaches), or having water/juice spilled over them. Now, in such cases you either open the phone up, remove the battery and wait for it to dry, OR, don't do that and have it die.

    Also, 80% of women have their batteries drained to 0% daily which kills the battery in less than a year. Replacing it for $10 is logical and easy. Sending the phone to a service centre and not having it for weeks is not...

    That doesn't mean banks are bad. I actually have one and use it when traveling. But I think being able to open the phone is a necessity.

    ReplyDelete
  31. The battery bank is a solution, but you have to carry it like a normal charger in the first place. If it's a contest between the battery bank v normal charger, the bank wins hands down because you can charge the phone in a locked drawer or locker, avoiding theft or vandalism by coworkers. (I've had coworkers vandalize my stuff.)

    The optimum is a replaceable battery that when new can go a WEEKEND on one charge. When the battery wears out, you replace the battery, not the whole $600 phone. A $600 device designed to fail on purpose is a stupid purchase. You wouldn't buy an iCar where you have to pay Apple $2000 to get a jump, would you?

    But the smartphone makers decided that barely a workday brand new on a charge is "good enough" and it is clearly not. Not simply in the case of "rough" work places but people in the field all day also would agree that "good enough" isn't good enough. I hope Steve Jobs, who came up with the irreplaceable battery is in the Dante-undocumented 10th level of Hell. Along with various mass-murdering dictators.

    ReplyDelete
  32. This whole coversation is rediculious! I have an eight year old Samsung M610 cell phone which at the time was the most advanced and beautiful phone out there. Its been dropped 100 times and still works fine. Ofcourse the battery has been replaced numerous times which they sell on line for a couple of bucks, ebay etc. Doesnt anybody take solis in the fact they could use something they fell in love with for many years to come. The companies love making you things your going to have to throw away after a couple of years. Thats the exact reason the american car companies were doing until Toyota and the rest showed up. I thought the conversation was about keeping something of quality that we love as opposed to something thats merely disposable.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Not to mention you can save your phone and battery, if your phone gets accidentally wet by removing the battery from the phone. Try to do that with the sealed phone. Oh...wait your phone just became a worthless brick, and what's that your warranty just expired. Oh looks like your forced to get a new one.

    ReplyDelete
  34. I don't see it all badly, but I think there are two negative points (which are, in fact, already being applied): 1 - Damage to the environment 2 - Heavy because they would already be "two devices".

    ReplyDelete